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Purple sea star Pisaster ochraceus Midshipman Fish Embryos Porichthys notatus Sea Hair Enteromorpha sp.

Purple sea stars Pisaster ochraceus

 

Did you Know?

 

COMMON PURPLE SEA STAR

If the purple sea star looses an arm, a new one will grow in its place. The single arm will often regenerate four new ones and a body. Two new starfish! Wouldn't it be wonderful if we were able to grow back fingers and arms like a sea star?

BULL KELP

The bull Kelp is attached to the rocks by a holdfast. A hollow bulb allows leaf like blades to float near the surface to be exposed to the sun for photosynthesis. Look for the whip like stalks that have broken loose and washed ashore after storms.

LIMPET

If you look between the foot and the shell of the keyhole limpet you will probably find a scaleworm. These two animals live together in a symbiotic or 'friend-helping-friend' relationship. The shelled limpet shares its home and food with the scaleworm and in return the scaleworm snaps at the tube feet of attacking purple sea stars.

 
Text from: Bard, Shannon. (1990) "A Guide to Marine Exploration and Conservation." British Columbia : Western Canada Wilderness Committee.
 
 
Purple sea star Pisaster ochraceus Midshipman Fish Embryos Porichthys notatus Sea Hair Enteromorpha sp.

Purple sea stars Pisaster ochraceus

 
All images ©2004 Shannon Bard. Use of images is prohibited without permission.